1912: The ice-berg that sunk the Titanic

Taken by the chief steward of the German ocean liner SS Prinz Adalbert, which on April 15 was sailing through the North Atlantic mere miles away from where theTitanic had sunk the night before. At the time, the chief steward hadn't yet learned of theTitanic's fate. He spotted a streak of red paint along the iceberg's base, which most likely meant a ship had collided with it in the last twelve hours

Taken by a Captain De Carteret of the Minia, one of a few cable ships - vessels ordinarily used to lay deep sea cables, such as those for telecommunications - sent to the site of the shipwreck to recover corpses and debris. The captain claimed this was the only iceberg in the area, and the red paint was again a clear sign that a ship had recently struck it.

Source: i09

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