1950s: Illustrated Pepsi Ads

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Goggles aficionado. Retronaut’s founder and curator.

8 Responses

  1. Kaitlyn

    It’s amusing how folks want to point the finger at soft drinks for the obesity problem nowadays…. yet Pepsi is billed here as “light”. [/irony]

    I can’t imagine serving Pepsi at a wedding…. but I guess some people do… ;)

    Reply
  2. qka

    Look at the size of those bottles- a typical serving wasn’t a liter or more, as it is today. Nor did they drink it morning, noon, and night, as some people do today.

    Then there is the whole high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) controversy. At least in the US, almost all soda pop (that isn’t “diet”) is sweetened with HFCS. HFCS has a different effect on the body than sucrose as in cane sugar that used to be used. Some scientists claim that this difference is more likely to contribute to obesity.

    Reply
  3. Mark2

    Isn’t anyone going to say anything nice about the wonderful illustrations? I like them. (even the purple lawn chair that hurts my eyes a bit.)

    Reply
  4. melissa2012

    wow. Propaganda and lies, bandwagon everyone who’s attractive it’s probably because they drink sugar water. Oh wait, that’s a lie.

    Reply
  5. joe

    The knock on Soft Drinks is ridiculous.What about cake,ice cream,sugar in your coffee?Why not have big brother regulate everything we eat and drink.Everything in moderation.Each individual is responsible for themselves.

    Reply
  6. Reenilou

    I just Luuuuv the fashions in these ads. They are elegant and effective in defining who drinks Pepsi. Advertising then as now is nothing but psychological manipulation so get over it.

    Reply
  7. Vaughnstake

    Wow… have most of you forgotten how to appreciate the ART that these ads represent? Climb off the soapboxes and enjoy Retronaut for what it does best- showing us slices of the past!

    Reply

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