1883: Dinner Menus for the Coronation of Tsar Alexander III

Dinner Menus for the Coronation of Tsar Alexander III Dinner Menus for the Coronation of Tsar Alexander III Dinner Menus for the Coronation of Tsar Alexander III Dinner Menus for the Coronation of Tsar Alexander III

Menus by Viktor Mikhailovich Vasnetsov (1848-1926)

12 Responses

  1. Sergey

    Lunch 27th May
    Mushroom cream soup
    Broth with root
    Pies
    Sterlet with cucumbers
    Boiled beef
    Quails with grind pea
    Crayfish cold collation
    Roast turkey and snipe
    Salad
    Asparagus dutch sauce
    Pineapple pie
    Icecream
    Savory

    Lunch 20th May 1883
    Crayfish soup
    Pies
    Wild goat
    Chicken cutlets
    Ruffe aspic
    Roast game
    Salad and cucumbers
    Mangetout
    Pone
    Icecream

    Last pages
    Borsch and soup
    Pies
    Steam sterlet
    Veal
    Aspic
    Roast fryer and mangetout
    Asparagus
    Guriev porridge
    Icecream

    The last page: stuf like “glory for God, tsar, russians, guests, servants and bread”
    —————–
    From Russia with love friends =)

    Reply
  2. Jaime

    Fascinating stuff, and a typically substantial meal. Someone probably said: “Add a salad somewhere in there, will you?”

    Reply
  3. Susan

    Thanks for the translations Sergey! Ice cream and pineapple were the height of luxury back then. What I find interesting is that except for a couple of items (roast game and borsch, particularly) this is a very French menu. I wouldn’t be surprised if the chefs cooking this were from Paris! And yes, there’s always an aspic :-)

    Reply
    • charles goodall

      French culture was integrated into Russian high culture. Yes there probably were French chefs for this fine dinner.

      Reply
  4. Martha Sherwood

    Ice cream not particularly a luxury item in Russia or the northeastern US in the 19th century – cranked ice cream freezers using stored lake ice and rock salt were invented around 1810. It was definitely a luxury item in climates without a cold winter.

    Reply
  5. Ironic Irene

    Already during Peter the Great’s time, and even more so during times of Elizabeth and Catherine the Great, pineapples were eaten at the court as some cabbage, or carrots. They were grown in the hothouses of many aristocratic families.

    Reply

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