“USS Macon (ZRS-5) was an airship built and operated by the United States Navy for scouting. She served as a ”flying aircraft carrier”, launching Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk biplane fighters. In service for less than two years, in 1935 Macon was damaged in a storm and lost off California’s Big Sur coast.”

- Wikipedia

Construction of the U.S.S. Macon Airship Construction of the U.S.S. Macon Airship Construction of the U.S.S. Macon Airship Construction of the U.S.S. Macon Airship Construction of the U.S.S. Macon Airship Construction of the U.S.S. Macon Airship

11 Responses

  1. Howie

    So is that the Moffett Field hangar that you got to fly through in MS FlightSim? It looks like at least the sister aircraft (USS Akron) was based there, although it was called NAS Sunnyvale at that time (Moffett was killed in the loss of the Akron).

    Reply
  2. qka

    According to Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Macon_(ZRS-5) ), the USS Macon was built in Springfield, OH.

    I once had the opportunity to go inside one of the remaining dirigible hangars at the Naval Air Station at Lakehurst, NJ. (That is where the Hindenburg crashed.) At the time it was being used to house large Navy helicopters. Inside the hanger, those large helicopters looked very small.

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    • david nelson

      HELLO IT SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP IN SE SUMMIT COUNTY NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH THE CITY OF SPRINGFIELD OHIO. GOODYEAR AIRCRAFT COMPANY WAS ANNEX IN TO THE CITY OF AKRON IN THE 1980

      Reply
  3. Feng

    My Great Uncle Chick (Charles Solar) was on this thing when it went down off the coast of California. He also survived the crash of the Shenandoah over Ohio. I only learned all this from my mom after he died (of old age). I don’t know if he was a jinx or just a minor weather deity.

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  4. saeraphin

    I would really like to see those things fly again, a shame they are so… volatile.

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    • Simon

      The American ones weren’t volatile, being helium-filled, just not as good as the German ones, which, on the other hand, were …

      Reply
  5. Miguel

    The Macon and Akron were more advanced than their fellow Zeppelins in some aspects, like the triple keel design, exhaust systems, and pivoting propellers. (all made by the same company, although the Macon and Akron were built here in parntership with Goodyear). Two mistakes led to the demise of these ships, one was the poor training of the crews which led to panicked reactions, and the other that Germany based bosses changed the location of the fins to a weak place, and allowed the lack of internal structure for the fins. Remove any of these issues, and the ships would have lasted longer, and revolutionized naval air surveilance.
    Modern zeppelins use the triple keel and pivoting propellers, of the Macon/Akron, and three are being assembled here by the old Goodyear/Zeppelin partnership. they have also implemented stronger fin support, and strictly trained crews that benefit from fly by wire technology.

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  6. Joel

    They have similar hangars still standing in Tustin, California. Two. Presumably one for the Macon and one for the Akron?

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  7. John

    The structure in the photos is the Godyear Airdock located in Akron, Ohio, where it still stands. Goodyear was a leader in dirigible and blimp design and manufacture. At the time of its construction and for many years after, the Airdock was the largest building in the world without interior structural suport, as it was designed to house the dirigibles that Goodyear built, (the Macon, the Akron and the Shenandoah).

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  8. Jerry

    Photo 12 (from the top) is certainly NAS Sunnyvale. In the background are the tidal marshes of the south end of San Francisco Bay. On Google Earth, you can see some of the structures, like the water tower and some of the buildings, that are visible in the photo.

    Reply
  9. don

    It is positively Moffet Field …i have been inside it many times and lived a couple miles away for many years.

    Reply

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